Skip to content

Report

Local indicators of child poverty after housing costs, 2018/19: summary of estimates of child poverty after housing costs in local authorities and parliamentary constituencies, 2014/15 - 2018/19

Authors

Publication date

Oct 2020

Summary

Our latest indicators of local child poverty, published by the End Child Poverty campaign, show an alarming increase in child poverty rates, provide the most robust local estimates of child poverty to date. They build on official data from tax and benefit records, which DWP and HMRC have used to produce local estimates of child poverty. These official figures do not take account of housing costs, underestimating the extent of low disposable income, especially in London and southern England. We have therefore modelled the effect of local housing costs to produce an "after housing cost (AHC)" poverty estimate. This involves using survey data to estimate the correlation between private rent levels and the ratio of AHC to BHC poverty, and applying the result to each local area.

Subjects

Area Effects, Regional Economics, Geography, Young People, Households, Poverty, Public Policy, Welfare Benefits, Household Economics, Taxation, Surveys, and Housing Market

Links

http://www.endchildpoverty.org.uk/child-poverty-in-your-area-201415-201819/

Notes

Covered by over 50 media outlets


Related publications

  1. Families struggling to get basics to survive amid pandemic: one in four children in Scotland are living in poverty, new research has shown

    Donald Hirsch and Juliet Stone

    1. Area Effects
    2. Regional Economics
    3. Geography
    4. Young People
    5. Households
    6. Poverty
    7. Public Policy
    8. Welfare Benefits
    9. Household Economics
    10. Taxation
    11. Surveys
    12. Housing Market
  2. Child poverty increases in England across the north and Midlands

    Donald Hirsch and Juliet Stone

    1. Area Effects
    2. Regional Economics
    3. Geography
    4. Young People
    5. Households
    6. Poverty
    7. Public Policy
    8. Welfare Benefits
    9. Household Economics
    10. Taxation
    11. Surveys
    12. Housing Market
  3. ‘On a cliff edge’: Half of children in Barking and Dagenham in poverty, study shows

    Donald Hirsch and Juliet Stone

    1. Area Effects
    2. Regional Economics
    3. Geography
    4. Young People
    5. Households
    6. Poverty
    7. Public Policy
    8. Welfare Benefits
    9. Household Economics
    10. Taxation
    11. Surveys
    12. Housing Market
  4. Blackburn has highest increase of child poverty in North West

    Donald Hirsch and Juliet Stone

    1. Area Effects
    2. Regional Economics
    3. Geography
    4. Young People
    5. Households
    6. Poverty
    7. Public Policy
    8. Welfare Benefits
    9. Household Economics
    10. Taxation
    11. Surveys
    12. Housing Market
  5. New child poverty data reveals true extent of levelling up challenge

    Donald Hirsch and Juliet Stone

    1. Area Effects
    2. Regional Economics
    3. Geography
    4. Young People
    5. Households
    6. Poverty
    7. Public Policy
    8. Welfare Benefits
    9. Household Economics
    10. Taxation
    11. Surveys
    12. Housing Market

#526358


Research home

Research home

News

Latest findings, new research

Publications search

Search all research by subject and author

Podcasts

Researchers discuss their findings and what they mean for society

Projects

Background and context, methods and data, aims and outputs

Events

Conferences, seminars and workshops

Survey methodology

Specialist research, practice and study

Taking the long view

ISER's annual report

Themes

Key research themes and areas of interest