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Journal Article

Children’s age at parental divorce and depression in early and mid-adulthood

Authors

Publication date

11 Jan 2019

Summary

This study aimed to assess whether children’s age at their parents’ divorce is associated with depression in early and mid-adulthood, as indicated by medication purchase. A sibling comparison method was used to control for unobserved factors shared between siblings. The data were extracted from the Norwegian Population Register and Norwegian Prescription Database and included about 181,000 individuals aged 20–44 who had experienced parental divorce and 636,000 who had not. Controlling for age in 2004, sex, and birth order, children who were aged 15–19 when their parents divorced were 12 per cent less likely to purchase antidepressants as adults in 2004–08 than those experiencing the divorce aged 0–4. The corresponding reduction for those aged 20+ at the time of divorce was 19 per cent. However, the association between age at parental divorce and antidepressant purchases was only evident among women and those whose mothers had low education.

Published in

Population Studies

DOI

https://doi.org/10.1080/00324728.2018.1549747

ISSN

16

Subjects

Psychology, Young People, Family Formation And Dissolution, Well Being, Health, Life Course Analysis, and Sociology Of Households

Links

University of Essex, Albert Sloman Library Periodicals *restricted to University of Essex registered users* - http://catalogue.essex.ac.uk/record=b1591836~S5; University of Essex Research Repository - http://repository.essex.ac.uk/23806/

Notes

Online Early

#525459


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