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Journal Article

Education, income and happiness: panel evidence for the UK

Authors

Publication date

14 Nov 2018

Summary

Using panel data from the BHPS and its Understanding Society extension, we study life satisfaction (LS) and income over nearly two decades, for samples split by education, and age, to our knowledge for the first time. The highly educated went from lowest to highest LS, though their average income was always higher. In spite of rapid income growth up to 2008/2009, the less educated showed no rise in LS, while highly educated LS rose after the crash despite declining real income. In panel LS regressions with individual fixed effects, none of the income variables was significant for the highly educated.

Published in

Empirical Economics

DOI

https://doi.org/10.1007/s00181-018-1586-5

ISSN

16

Subjects

Psychology, Education, Economics, Income Dynamics, Well Being, Life Course Analysis, and Higher Education

Notes

Online Early; Open Access; This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made.


Related publications

  1. Education, income and happiness: panel evidence for the UK

    Felix FitzRoy and Michael Nolan

    1. Psychology
    2. Education
    3. Economics
    4. Income Dynamics
    5. Well Being
    6. Life Course Analysis
    7. Higher Education

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