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Journal Article

Adaptation to externally driven change: the impact of political change on job satisfaction in the public sector

Authors

Publication date

Jun 2014

Summary

This article uses a quasi-natural experiment to investigate the
adaptation of job satisfaction to externally driven political change in
the public sector. This is important because democratic government
bureaucracies often experience changes in leadership after elections.
The analyses are based on data drawn from a large longitudinal data set,
the British Household Panel Survey. Findings indicate that the impact
of political elections is largely weak and temporary and is only present
for men. For women, the internal processes of the organization tend to
be more important. These findings suggest that changes in political
leadership may not be associated with fundamental changes in policy.

Published in

Public Administration Review

Volume and page numbers

74 , 384 -395

DOI

http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/puar.12204

ISSN

16

Subjects

Politics, Labour Market, Organizations And Firms, and Well Being

Notes

Open Access article


Related publications

  1. Male public sector workers boosted by change of political leadership

    Vurain Tabvuma, Hong T. M. Bui, and Fabian Homberg

  2. Male public sector workers boosted by change of political leadership

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  3. Male public sector workers boosted by change of political leadership

    Vurain Tabvuma, Hong T. M. Bui, and Fabian Homberg

  4. Male public sector workers boosted by change of political leadership

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