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Journal Article

Re-engaging with survey non-respondents: evidence from three household panels

Authors

Publication date

Feb 2014

Summary

Previous research into the correlates and determinants of non-response
in longitudinal surveys has focused exclusively on why it is that
respondents at one survey wave choose not to participate at future
waves. This is very understandable if non-response is always an
absorbing state, but in many longitudinal surveys, and certainly most
household panels, this is not so. Indeed, in these surveys it is normal
practice to attempt to make contact with many non-respondents at the
next wave. This study differs from previous research by examining
re-engagement with previous wave non-respondents. Drawing on data from
three national household panels it is found that the re-engagement
decision is indeed distinctly different from the decision about
continued participation. Further, these differences have clear
implications for the way that panel surveys should be administered given
the desire to enhance overall response rates.

Published in

Journal of the Royal Statistical Society Series A (Statistics in Society)

Volume and page numbers

177 , 499 -522

DOI

http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/rssa.12024

ISSN

16

Links

http://serlib0.essex.ac.uk/record=b1599822~S5

Notes

Albert Sloman Library Periodicals *restricted to Univ. Essex registered users*


Related publications

  1. Re-engaging with survey non-respondents: the BHPS, SOEP and HILDA survey experience

    Nicole Watson and Mark Wooden

  2. Re-engaging with survey non-respondents: the BHPS, SOEP and HILDA survey experience

    Nicole Watson and Mark Wooden

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