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Journal Article

Testing the ‘residential rootedness’ hypothesis of self-employment for Germany and the UK

Authors

Publication date

2013

Summary

Based on the notion that entrepreneurship is a ‘local event’, the literature argues that entrepreneurs are ‘rooted’ in place. This paper tests the ‘residential rootedness’ hypothesis of self-employment by examining for Germany and the UK whether the self-employed are less likely to move over long distances (internal migration) than workers in paid employment. Using longitudinal data from the German Socio-Economic Panel Study (SOEP) and the British Household Panel Survey (BHPS), and accounting for transitions in employment status we found little evidence that the self-employed in Germany and the UK are more rooted in place than workers in paid employment. Generally speaking, the self-employed were no less likely than workers in paid employment to migrate over longer distance. In contrast to the residential rootedness hypothesis we found that entry into self-employment and female self-employment are associated with internal migration, and that the self-employed who work from home (home-based businesses) are fairly geographically mobile. The gendered results suggest that women might use self-employment as a strategy to be spatially mobile with their household, or as a strategy to stay in the workforce after having moved residence until they find a job in the more secure wage and salary sector.

Published in

Environment and Planning: A

Volume and page numbers

45 , 1219 -1239

DOI

http://dx.doi.org/10.1068/a45288

ISSN

16

Subjects

Migration and Labour Market

Links

http://serlib0.essex.ac.uk/record=b1811570~S5

Notes

Albert Sloman Library Periodicals *restricted to Univ. Essex registered users*

#521686


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