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Journal Article

“I'm afraid I have bad news for you.” Estimating the impact of different health impairments on subjective well-being

Authors

Publication date

Jun 2013

Summary


Bad health decreases individuals’ happiness, but few studies measure the impact of specific illnesses. We apply matching estimators to examine how changes in different (objective) conditions of bad health affect subjective well-being for a sample of 100,265 observations from the British Household Panel Survey (BHPS) database (1996e2006). The strongest effect is for alcohol and drug abuse, followed by anxiety, depression and other mental illnesses, stroke and cancer. Adaptation to health impairments varies across health impairments. There is also a puzzling asymmetry: strong adverse reactions to deteriorations in health appear alongside weak increases in well-being after health improvements. In conclusion, our analysis offers a more detailed account of how bad health influences happiness than accounts focusing on how bad self-assessed health affects individual well-being.

Published in

Social Science and Medicine

Volume and page numbers

87 , 155 -167

DOI

http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.socscimed.2013.03.025

ISSN

16

Subjects

Drug/Alcohol Abuse, Psychology, Well Being, and Health

Links

http://serlib0.essex.ac.uk/record=b1586997~S5

Notes

Albert Sloman Library Periodicals *restricted to Univ. Essex registered users*

#521673


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