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Journal Article

Longitudinal relationships between core self-evaluations and job satisfaction

Authors

Publication date

Mar 2012

Summary


Core self-evaluations (CSE) have been proposed as a static personality trait that influences individuals’ work experiences. However, CSE can also be influenced by work experiences. Based on the corresponsive principle of personality development, this study incorporated both dispositional and contextual perspectives to examine longitudinal reciprocal relationships between CSE and job satisfaction. Longitudinal data from 5,827 participants in the British Household Panel Survey from 1997 to 2006 were analyzed. A series of structural equation models revealed that job satisfaction and the growth of job satisfaction in previous years positively predicted CSE in a later year. In turn, CSE contributed to higher job satisfaction and growth of job satisfaction in following years. This result shows that both dispositional and contextual forces interweave to shape individuals’ self-views and experiences over time.

Published in

Journal of Applied Psychology

Volume and page numbers

97 , 331 -342

DOI

http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/a0025673

ISSN

16

Subjects

Psychology and Labour Market

Links

http://serlib0.essex.ac.uk/record=b1665537~S5

Notes

Albert Sloman Library Periodicals *restricted to Univ. Essex registered users*

#520611


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