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Journal Article

Breastfeeding is associated with improved child cognitive development: a population-based cohort study

Authors

Publication date

Jan 2012

Summary

Objective: To assess the association between breastfeeding and child cognitive development in term and preterm children.
Study design: We analyzed data on white singleton children from the United Kingdom Millennium Cohort Study. Children were grouped according to breastfeeding duration. Results were stratified by gestational age at birth: 37 to 42 weeks (term, n = 11 101), and 28 to 36 weeks (preterm, n = 778). British Ability Scales tests were administered at age 5 years (naming vocabulary, pattern construction, and picture similarities subscales).
Results:The mean scores for all subscales increased with breastfeeding duration. After adjusting for confounders, there was a significant difference in mean score between children who were breastfed and children who were never breastfed: in term children, a two-point increase in score for picture similarities (when breastfed ≥4 months) and naming vocabulary (when breastfed ≥6 months); in preterm children, a 4-point increase for naming vocabulary (when breastfed ≥4 months) and picture similarities (when breastfed ≥2 months) and a 6-point increase for pattern construction (when breastfed ≥2 months). These differences suggest that breastfed children will be 1 to 6 months ahead of children who were never breastfed.
Conclusions: In white, singleton children in the United Kingdom, breastfeeding is associated with improved cognitive development, particularly in children born preterm.

Published in

Journal of Pediatrics

Volume and page numbers

160 , 25 -32

DOI

http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jpeds.2011.06.035

ISSN

16

Subjects

Child Development and Childbearing: Fertility

Notes

not held in Res Lib - bibliographic reference only


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