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Research Paper IZA Discussion Papers 5612

Partner (dis)agreement on moving desires and the subsequent moving behaviour of couples

Authors

Publication date

Mar 2011

Abstract

Residential mobility decisions are known to be made at the household level. However, most empirical analyses of residential mobility relate moving behaviour to the housing and neighbourhood satisfaction and pre-move thoughts of individuals. If partners in a couple do not share evaluations of dwelling or neighbourhood quality or do not agree on whether moving is (un)desirable, ignoring these disagreements will lead to an inaccurate assessment of the strength of the links between moving desires and actual moves. This study is one of the first to investigate disagreements in moving desires between partners and thesubsequent consequences of such disagreements for moving behaviour. Drawing on British Household Panel Survey (BHPS) data, we find that disagreement about the desirability of moving is most likely where partners also disagree about the quality of their dwelling or neighbourhood. Panel logistic regression models show that the moving desires of both partners interact to affect the moving behaviour of couples. Only 7.6% of couples move if only the man desires to move, whereas 20.1% of shared moving desires lead to a subsequent move.

Subjects

Households and Housing Market

Links

http://ftp.iza.org/dp5612.pdf

Notes

Discussion paper


Related publications

  1. Partner (dis)agreement on moving desires and the subsequent moving behaviour of couples

    Rory Coulter, Maarten van Ham, and Peteke Feijten

    1. Households
    2. Housing Market

#520020


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