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Journal Article

Does housework lower wages? Evidence for Britain

Authors

Publication date

2011

Abstract

This paper uses the British Household Panel Survey to present the first estimates of the housework-wage relationship in Britain. Controlling for permanent unobserved heterogeneity, we find that housework has a negative impact on the wages of men and women, both married and single, who work full-time. Among women working part-time, only single women suffer a housework penalty. The housework penalty is uniform across occupations within full-time jobs but some part-time jobs appear to be more compatible with housework than others. We find tentative evidence that the housework penalty is larger when there are children present.

Published in

Oxford Economic Papers

Volume and page numbers

63 , 187 -210

DOI

http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/oep/gpq011

Links

http://serlib0.essex.ac.uk/record=b1607753~S5

Notes

BioMed alert; Albert Sloman Library Periodicals *restricted to Univ. Essex registered users*


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  3. Does Housework Lower Wages? Evidence for Britain

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