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Journal Article

Changing attitudes to gender roles: a longitudinal analysis of ordinal response data from the British Household Panel Study

Authors

Publication date

2009

Abstract

This article examines changes in attitudes to gender roles in contemporary Britain by using a first-order Markov process in which cumulative transition probabilities are logistic functions of a set of personal and socioeconomic characteristics of respondents. The data are taken from the British Household Panel Study (BHPS). The attitudinal responses examined take the form of ordinal responses concerning gender roles in 1991 and 2003. The likelihood function is partitioned to make possible the use of existing software for estimating model parameters. For the BHPS data, it was found that, depending on the value of the response in 1991, a variety of factors were important determinants of attitudes to gender roles by 2003.

Published in

International Sociology

Volume

24 (3):346-367

DOI

http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0268580909102912

Subjects

Social Groups and Social Attitudes

Links

http://serlib0.essex.ac.uk/record=b1584798~S5

Notes

Web of Knowledge alert; Albert Sloman Library Periodicals *restricted to Univ. Essex registered users*


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