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Research Paper HEDG Working Papers 08/19

Contractual conditions, working conditions, health and well-being in the British Household Panel Survey

Authors

Publication date

2008

Abstract

We consider the effects of contractual and working conditions on self-assessed health and psychological well-being using twelve waves (1991/92 - 2002/2003) of the British Household Panel Survey. While one branch of the literature suggests that “atypical” contractual conditions have a significant impact on health and well-being, another suggests that health is damaged by adverse working conditions. As far as we are aware, previous studies have not explicitly considered the two factors jointly. Our aim is to combine the two branches of the literature to assess the distinct effects of contractual and working conditions on health and psychological well-being and how these effects vary across individuals. For self-assessed health the dependent variable is categorical, and we estimate non-linear dynamic panel ordered probit models, while for psychological well-being we estimate a dynamic linear specification. Our estimates show that being unsatisfied with the number of hours worked has a negative influence on the health of individuals who have a part-time job. Having a high level of employability appears to influence positively the health and psychological well-being of individuals with temporary job arrangements. Family structure appears to influence the health and well-being of workers with atypical contractual conditions.

Subjects

Labour Market, Well Being, and Health

Links

http://econpapers.repec.org/paper/yorhectdg/08_2F19.htm

Notes

Econpapers search; working paper

#511723


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