Skip to content

Journal Article

A public good version of the collective household model: an empirical approach with an application to British household data

Authors

Publication date

2008

Abstract

In this paper we consider an empirical collective household model of time allocation for two-earner households. The novelty of this paper is that we estimate a version of the collective household model, where the internally produced goods and externally purchased goods are assumed to be public. The empirical results suggest that (1) Preferences of men and women differ; (2) Although there are significant individual variations, on average the utility functions of men and women are equally weighted in the household utility function; (3) Differences in the ratio of the partners’ hourly wages are explanatory for how individual utilities are weighted in the household utility function. (4) The female’s preference for household production is influenced by family size, but this does not hold for the male; (5) Both the male and the female have a backward-bending labor supply curve; (6) Labor-supply curves are forward-bending with respect to the partner’s wage rate; (7) Our model rejects the unitary Slutsky symmetry condition.

Published in

Review of Economics of the Household

Volume

6 (2):169-191

DOI

http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11150-007-9028-8

Subjects

Labour Economics, Households, and Wages And Earnings

Links

http://serlib0.essex.ac.uk/record=b1656730

Notes

EBSCO - but only because of alert for another article. Looked at others in issue and found this one. Maybe EBSCO only searches abstracts? Confirmed use with author. JCI 23/04/08; Albert Sloman Library Periodicals *restricted to Univ. Essex registered users*

#511336


Research home

Research home

News

Latest findings, new research

Publications search

Search all research by subject and author

Podcasts

Researchers discuss their findings and what they mean for society

Projects

Background and context, methods and data, aims and outputs

Events

Conferences, seminars and workshops

Survey methodology

Specialist research, practice and study

Taking the long view

ISER's annual report

Themes

Key research themes and areas of interest