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Journal Article

The short and long term effects of government training on subjective well being

Authors

Publication date

2008

Abstract

This paper analyses the effect of participation in government training on subjective well-being. I use use Strandh's (2001) extension of Jahoda (1982) and Fryer's (1986) theories on the relationship between subjective well-being and labour market status as the theoretical framework. This extension suggests that participation in government training raises the subjective well-being of the unemployed and it furthermore predicts a long-term effect of previous participation on well-being. I analyse data from the first 13 waves of a longitudinal data, the British Household Panel Survey, using the Mundlak extended random effect model. I find that both current and previous participation in government training has positive effects on subjective well-being, although the effect of previous participation decreases over time.

Published in

European Sociological Review

Volume

24 (4):451-462

DOI

http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/esr/jcn005

Links

http://serlib0.essex.ac.uk/record=b1614272~S5

Notes

Originally (Advance Access), Feb.2008; serial sequence - indexed article

#511001


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