Skip to content

Journal Article

The de-collectivisation of pay setting in Britain 1990-98: incidence, determinants and impact

Authors

Publication date

2007

Abstract

What were the causes and consequences of declining collective bargaining coverage in Britain? The demise of collective bargaining did not lead to a greater use of individualised payment mechanisms, 'high-involvement' practices or productivity gains. Wage inequality rose as a result of the decline. However, workplaces that abandoned bargaining created more jobs. Overall, these results raise questions about Britain's labour market performance during the 1990s because they suggest that falling unemployment as a result of weaker trade unions came at the price of slower productivity growth and widening male wage inequality.

Published in

Industrial Relations Journal

Volume

38 (1):33-50

DOI

http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1468-2338.2007.00434.x

Subjects

Labour Economics and Wages And Earnings

Links

http://serlib0.essex.ac.uk/search/s?SEARCH=industrial+relations+journal&sortdropdown=-&searchscope=5

Notes

Albert Sloman Library Periodicals *restricted to Univ. Essex registered users*

#509927


Research home

Research home

News

Latest findings, new research

Publications search

Search all research by subject and author

Podcasts

Researchers discuss their findings and what they mean for society

Projects

Background and context, methods and data, aims and outputs

Events

Conferences, seminars and workshops

Survey methodology

Specialist research, practice and study

Taking the long view

ISER's annual report

Themes

Key research themes and areas of interest