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Journal Article

Tied migration and subsequent employment: evidence from couples in Britain

Authors

Publication date

2007

Abstract

We use unique information on migration behaviour and reasons for migration to study the impact of tied migration on labour market outcomes among husbands and wives. Fewer than 2% of couples migrate for job-related reasons and the majority of these move for reasons associated with the husband's job. Estimates from dynamic random-effects models indicate that husbands and wives in couples that migrated for job-related reasons suffer lower job retention rates than non-migrants. Tied migration reduces the probability of subsequent employment for both husbands and wives and in particular has a large negative impact on job retention rates among wives.

Published in

Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics

Volume and page numbers

69 (6):795-818 , 795 -818

DOI

http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1468-0084.2007.00482.x

Subjects

Migration, Labour Market, and Family Formation And Dissolution

Links

http://serlib0.essex.ac.uk/search/s?SEARCH=oxford+bulletin+of+economics+and+statistics&sortdropdown=-&searchscope=5

Notes

Albert Sloman Library Periodicals *restricted to Univ. Essex registered users*


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  1. Tied migration and subsequent employment: evidence from couples in Britain

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  2. Tied migration and Employment Outcomes: Evidence from Couples in Britain

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  3. Tied migration and Employment Outcomes: Evidence from Couples in Britain

    Mark P. Taylor

  4. Tied migration and Employment Outcomes: Evidence from Couples in Britain

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