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Journal Article

Marriage and wages: a test of the specialization hypothesis

Authors

Publication date

2008

Abstract

We investigate the relationship between marriage and wages among men in Britain using panel data. Our econometric specifications allow for observed and unobserved heterogeneity and explicitly test the role of intra-household specialization in explaining the observed relationship. Our estimates provide evidence for the existence of large selection effects into marriage based on observable and unobservable characteristics that are positively correlated with wages. After accounting for individual-specific time-invariant effects and a wide range of individual, household, job and employer related characteristics, we find a statistically significant premium that can be attributed to productivity differences largely resulting from intra-household specialization.

Published in

Economica

Volume and page numbers

75 (299):569-591 , 569 -591

DOI

http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1468-0335.2007.00630.x

Subjects

Family Formation And Dissolution and Wages And Earnings

Links

http://serlib0.essex.ac.uk/search/s?SEARCH=economica&sortdropdown=-&searchscope=5

Notes

Originally 'Online Early'; Albert Sloman Library Periodicals *restricted to Univ. Essex registered users*


Related publications

  1. Marriage and wages

    Elena Bardasi and Mark P. Taylor

  2. Marriage and Wages: A Test of the Specialisation Hypothesis

    Elena Bardasi and Mark P. Taylor

  3. Marriage and Wages: A Test of the Specialisation Hypothesis

    Elena Bardasi and Mark P. Taylor

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