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Journal Article

Restructuring, reskilling and redundancy: a study of the dynamics of the UK labour market, 1990-1995

Authors

Publication date

2004

Abstract

This study reveals the longer term consequences of redundancy, shown to include discontinuous employment, deskilling and significant movement down the earnings distribution. Using evidence from the British Household Panel Survey, it is shown that craft and low-skilled occupations experienced the major share of redundancies in the period 1991-95. Workers made redundant are less likely to work in future years and are more likely to experience significant downward movements in their occupational position and earnings. Work-related training is received by a good proportion of ex-redundant workers who regained employment during the period studied, but no evidence was found to support the hypothesis that the experience of training may protect them from the negative consequences of redundancy.

Published in

DADOS: Revista de Ciências Sociais

Volume and page numbers

47 (3):419-471 , 419 -471

Subjects

Labour Market, Labour Economics, Households, and Surveys

Links

http://serlib0.essex.ac.uk/search/s?SEARCH=dados

Notes

Albert Sloman Library Periodicals *restricted to Univ. Essex registered users*


Related publications

  1. Restructuring, reskilling and redundancy: a study of the dynamics of the UK labour market, 1990-1995

    Peter Elias

    1. Labour Market
    2. Households
    3. Surveys

#508011


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