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Journal Article

Testing some predictions of human capital theory: new training evidence from Britain

Authors

Publication date

2005

Abstract

We confront the predictions of various theories with new training data from the British Household Panel Survey. We find that employer-financed training is associated with significantly higher wages at current and future firms, with a larger impact in future firms. This is consistent with human capital theory with credit constraints and with the new training literature assuming imperfectly competitive labor markets.

Published in

Review of Economics and Statistics

Volume and page numbers

87 (2):391-394 , 391 -394

Subjects

Training: Labour Market, Labour Market, Labour Economics, and Wages And Earnings

Links

http://serlib0.essex.ac.uk/search/sreview+of+economics+and+statistics/sreview+of+economics+and+statistics/1%2C1%2C2%2CB/frameset&FF=sreview+of+economics+and+statistics&2%2C%2C2

Notes

Albert Sloman Library Periodicals *restricted to Univ. Essex registered users*


Related publications

  1. Testing Some Predictions of Human Capital Theory: New Training Evidence from Britain

    Alison L. Booth and Mark L. Bryan

  2. Testing Some Predictions of Human Capital Theory: New Training Evidence from Britain

    Alison L. Booth and Mark L. Bryan

  3. Testing Some Predictions of Human Capital Theory: New Training Evidence from Britain

    Alison L. Booth and Mark L. Bryan

  4. Testing Some Predictions of Human Capital Theory: New Training Evidence from Britain

    Alison L. Booth and Mark L. Bryan

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