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Journal Article

Migration and geographical inequalitites in health in Britain

Authors

Publication date

2000

Abstract

This paper explores the role of migration in creating geographical inequalities in mortality at the district level in Britain for the British Household Panel Study sample — a representative sample of 10264 British residents born after 1890 and enumerated in 1991. Analysis of the mortality rates of migrants showed that male migration accounts for nearly all the differences in mortality rates between districts. The BHPS was then utilised to look at the lifetime socio-economic characteristics of these migrants and to compare men and women. It was found that the health of both men and women moving from high mortality districts to low mortality districts could be explained by advantage over their lifetimes. The small proportion of men and women moving from low mortality districts to high mortality districts represent a very mixed group and their contribution, whilst small, is intriguing, as is the very different mortality rates of men and women in this group.

Published in

Social Science and Medicine

Volume

50 (6): 861-878

Links

http://serlib0.essex.ac.uk/record=b1311932~S5

Notes

Albert Sloman Library Periodicals *restricted to Univ. Essex registered users*

#505941


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