Skip to content

Journal Article

Do health changes affect smoking? evidence from British panel data

Authors

Publication date

2002

Abstract

This paper uses seven waves of British Household Panel Survey (BHPS) data to examine the link between health developments while smoking (both one’s own and those of other smokers in the same household) and future cigarette consumption. We find those whose health worsens when smoking smoke less in the future, and are more likely to quit. This correlation is consistent with both a Grossman model of health demand (where all parameters are known) and with learning about the health consequences of smoking (where there is uncertainty). There is little effect on smoking from health developments amongst other smokers in the same household. As such, impersonal information provision may have less of an effect on smoking than the delivery of personalised health information, for example through the medical profession.

Published in

Journal of Health Economics

Volume

21 (4): 533-562

#505351


Research home

Research home

News

Latest findings, new research

Publications search

Search all research by subject and author

Podcasts

Researchers discuss their findings and what they mean for society

Projects

Background and context, methods and data, aims and outputs

Events

Conferences, seminars and workshops

Survey methodology

Specialist research, practice and study

Taking the long view

ISER's annual report

Themes

Key research themes and areas of interest