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Journal Article

Determinants and consequences of promotions in Britain

Authors

Publication date

2001

Abstract

Using longitudinal data from the British Household Panel Survey 1991-1995, this study finds that 9 percent of all workers report a promotion at their firm in any given year and that promotions account for approximately 36 percent of total job turnover, with small gender differences. Workers who are married, have full-time jobs, work overtime, are employed in large establishments and high-level occupations, and come from more recent cohorts have significantly higher chances of promotion. In addition, promotions lead to higher wage growth and increases in job satisfaction.

Published in

Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics

Volume and page numbers

63, 3, 279-310 , 279 -310

Links

http://serlib0.essex.ac.uk/search/soxford+bulletin+of+economics+and+statistics/soxford+bulletin+of+economics+and+statistics/1%2C1%2C2%2CB/frameset&FF=soxford+bulletin+of+economics+and+statistics&2%2C%2C2/indexsort=-

Notes

Albert Sloman Library Periodicals *restricted to Univ. Essex registered users*

#504609


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