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Journal Article

Does culture affect divorce? Evidence from European immigrants in the United States

Authors

Publication date

Jun 2013

Summary

This article explores the role of culture in determining divorce by examining country-of-origin differences in divorce rates of immigrants in the United States. Because childhood-arriving immigrants are all exposed to a common set of U.S. laws and institutions, we interpret relationships between their divorce tendencies and home-country divorce rates as evidence of the effect of culture. Our results are robust to controlling for several home-country variables, including average church attendance and gross domestic product (GDP). Moreover, specifications with country-of-origin fixed effects suggest that immigrants from countries with low divorce rates are especially less likely to be divorced if they reside among a large number of coethnics. Supplemental analyses indicate that divorce culture has a stronger impact on the divorce decisions of females than of males, pointing to a potentially gendered nature of divorce taboos.

Published in

Demography

Volume and page numbers

50 , 1013 -1038

DOI

http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s13524-012-0180-2

ISSN

16

Subjects

Migration, Family Formation And Dissolution, and Ethnic Groups

Links

http://serlib0.essex.ac.uk/record=b1612990~S5

Notes

Albert Sloman Library Periodicals *restricted to Univ. Essex registered users*

#521675


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